Horace Silver died today. Jazz legend Horace Silver, FYI.

“The Jody Grind” was my favorite as a teenager, still is to this day. This is a cool musician.



Skylock: An incredibly smart bike lock

We made this commercial for a bike lock called Skylock that’s smarter than any other bike lock. If you ride a bike that you don’t want thieved, if want to let people borrow your bike without you having to be there, if you want to know if some punk kid is getting slurpee all over your shit, invest in a Skylock.



Every Sandwich video I appear in at once

My friend Andy Baio just honored me with a wonderful tribute to what we do at Sandwich. So I’ll just leave it here. It’s twelve of me at once, talking at you in a non-threatening tone.

nbcsnl:

Late night snack! Feast on the leftover buffalo wing aka this web exclusive sketch with Andrew Garfield, Beck and Kyle!

This would have been my favorite sitcom, and SNL didn’t even run it.

nbcsnl:

Late night snack! Feast on the leftover buffalo wing aka this web exclusive sketch with Andrew Garfield, Beck and Kyle!

This would have been my favorite sitcom, and SNL didn’t even run it.



Ergo dronies

If Kottke says it’s a thing, it must be a thing. As consumer camera drones become more common, this kind of shot (or the one that inspired it by Amit Gupta) will become more familiar. Or this one I made with ominous shadow and a bit of vignette for enhanced drama.

There’s a reason that you’re going to see a lot of these from drone flyers like me, and it’s this: once you get past the novelty of taking a camera high up in the air, getting a bird’s eye view of stuff is actually a little boring.

What birds see is actually a little boring. Humans are interesting. Getting close to stuff is interesting. I bet if we could strap tiny cameras to bird heads, most of what we’d want to look at would happen when they fly close to people. If we could, we’d put cameras on bird heads to take pictures of ourselves.

But try flying your drone close to people. They get freaked out (trust me). Ergo dronies. You want to shoot people, you have to shoot the people you have access to. You end up shooting yourself. It’s not vain, it’s pragmatic.

The next part of the story is the fun part: discovering new things to do with it. New ways to shoot, new shots to get, new moves and new angles. What this feels like to me is that photography was just introduced and enthusiasts are figuring out what a wide shot is and how it feels different from a closeup. Or like the Steadicam was just invented and people are figuring out that running it down a narrow hallway looks really fucking cool.

This doesn’t happen very often, that we find new ways to see ourselves.



SNL “Blue River Dog Food”

This is the kind of sketch I’d like to take back in time to 1975 to show the cast and writers at SNL, to show them that they’re onto something good and just keep doing what they’re doing—it’s all going to work out.

popculturebrain:

Watch: ‘SNL' -  Blue River Dog Food

Cecily Strong, everybody.

(via nbcsnl)

Here is my kid trying to pay the buskers in this video (title is “Too Many Zooz”) because goddamn they’re earning it.
When I was at NYU, I spent a couple of months playing the drums on the platform at the 42nd Street station with a tenor saxophonist friend of mine who was studying at the New School. To date, maybe the most literary, romantic thing I’ve done with my life. Now it’s all tech vids and baby pics.
via SMASH TV

Here is my kid trying to pay the buskers in this video (title is “Too Many Zooz”) because goddamn they’re earning it.

When I was at NYU, I spent a couple of months playing the drums on the platform at the 42nd Street station with a tenor saxophonist friend of mine who was studying at the New School. To date, maybe the most literary, romantic thing I’ve done with my life. Now it’s all tech vids and baby pics.

via SMASH TV

Robinhood from Robinhood on Vimeo.



Robinhood

This is me, fetishizing Gordon Gekko and embracing my inner suspenders.



Mark One 3D printer

Okay, here is a video I made for a product you’re definitely not going buy. I’m not going to buy one either, and most likely, we know less than or equal to one person who will buy this product. But this product has a strong chance of changing the world.

If you care about 3D printers, you know what the Mark One means. If you don’t, you might not know that all the 3D printers out there print things in plastics that aren’t strong enough to really use for anything. They’re great for prototypes, and trinkets. They print tiny Eiffel Towers and Yoda busts. They’re not good for real things.

This is a 3D printer that can print with the world’s strongest material, carbon fiber, to make real things. And it’ll cost what other 3D printers cost. But can make real things. Not trinkets. For the same money. Real things.

That was the pitch I got from the founder of the company, Greg Mark. And I knew I had to meet him, because he’s one of the brightest, most energetic, charismatic founders I’ve gotten to work with. He’ll talk at you for an hour and your brain hurts, but in a good way. I spent two days with Greg and his team near MIT (where they all came from). It was cold as shit.

I knew that a video about the Mark One would be as much about the people who made it as the object itself. I wanted this to feel like a trailer for a documentary about an invention—the kind Errol Morris would make, as edited by Kubrick and scored by Beethoven.

I don’t know, maybe you could put Beethoven’s 9th on any Kickstarter video and it would feel like epic discovery.